• More Women aged 60 plus are continuing to work

    Women 60+ not giving up!

    For the first time in the UK, there are more women aged 60 to 64 in work than not, according to the Office for National Statistics. In fact there has been an increase of 51% since 2010. I know that there were changes to the state pension age for women in 2010 but is that the only reason? I can’t see myself ever retiring I’ve just had to work out how old I am. Is that a sign of old age? Anyway I’m 56 but have a birthday coming soon. But it’s just a number. Who cares? It’s all about your everyday experience. Perhaps I’m not old enough, but I…

  • Work shoes or barefoot on the beach?

    Is part-time work a good idea?

    Getting a balance between work and play becomes more important as we reach midlife. We value our time more and might want to pursue new interests. Some decide to go from full-time to part-time work as a stepping stone to retirement In my latest novel, The Long Marriage, Roger is thrown out of a high- powered job at 60 and is all at sea – he has no clue what he wants to do. His immediate reaction is to get back into insurance where he was before and his attempts prove unsuccessful forcing him to re-think.To To go straight from a busy full-time job into retirement can be a bit…

  • When do you want to retire?

    When’s the right time to retire?

    Do you dream of retiring and having an easy life, or do you want to just keep going? I don’t see myself as ever retiring. I’m lucky in that being a writer and working from home I can just keep going. At least until the brain cells seize up! In my new novel, The Long Marriage, we meet Roger in the first chapter and he has unexpectedly been made redundant at the age of sixty. He had a high-powered job in insurance and was pushed out to make way for a younger man leaving his ego bruised. He certainly wasn’t ready to relax and go fishing! Sixty is a difficult…

  • Mid-life Women: Masters of Reinvention

    Mid-life women often get significant change thrust upon them. Whether it’s divorce, the menopause, losing a job, financial difficulties or losing a loved one. And there’s a sense that time is running out. What impresses me, is how many women deal with it, reinventing themselves and creating a new life. Perhaps they need to build their confidence first before they can move on. Happily, there is help out there and most women will be willing to find it. Then they can start to make positive changes and to select what they desire. As a fifty plus woman and having lived a little, you are likely to have a clearer idea…

  • Jerries bombing in daylight!

    It was coming to the end of his lunch break. Guy had persuaded his fellow workers to join him outside the hanger as the sun was shining. They were always a bit more buoyant after a break and a sandwich and were having a quick game of footie with an old ball that Tommy had found. It felt good to run around for a bit. The foreman appeared at the door and Guy looked at his watch; there were a few minutes to go until they had to clock back in. But then he heard aircraft overhead. It was deafening; must have been really close. Jerries! Can’t be. Suddenly there…

  • The Changing Face of Food

    ‘It was Sunday and Molly had decided to follow a recipe for vegetable and oatmeal goulash which had appeared on one of the government information leaflets that had come through the door recently. It talked about ingenious ideas for fooling the taste buds and in this recipe a bit of paprika was meant to deceive you into thinking you were eating meat.’ An excerpt from my novel: The Disenchanted Hero. During WW2 food rationing was introduced as the government knew that it would be harder to import food. Foods like butter, meat, cheese, eggs, milk, tea, jam and even sweets were rationed!Most, like my character Molly, ‘dug for victory’ and…

  • 21st Woman has it all?

    In the recession of the 1930s it was not easy for women to work and only about 30% managed it. Of those nearly a third were in domestic service. The character in my latest novel, Molly Brooks, went into domestic service at the tender age of 15 out of necessity because her family fell on very difficult times. Her father fell ill and lost his shoe-making business which put him and Molly’s mother in the workhouse. Molly and her older brother, Joe, knew they had to get them out and so Molly took a huge risk and travelled from Truro in Cornwall up to London to take a position as…

  • A Tribute to Molly

    Molly Hugh was an extraordinary woman and I’d like to remember her on this, International Women’s Day. In 1925, at the tender age of fifteen, Molly and her sisters and one older brother were thrown out on the streets with their deaf and dumb parents. Father, Anthony, had become ill and his shoe-making business had fallen on hard times. In one fell swoop they had lost everything. But Molly was not someone to be easily beaten. She had already left school and was working in a local cake shop where she earned very little. She quickly realised she was going nowhere. It was down to her, as the oldest daughter,…